Alberttown, Fort Wellington police stations now equipped to investigate, report crime digitally

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The Guyana Police Force in collaboration with USAID and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) launched an automated software Thursday known as the Police Records Management Information System (PRMIS).

This system will allow for the transition from paper-based to digital reporting and investigating. PRMIS will assist the Force in improving citizen security, data management, analysis and monitoring for crime reduction.

The official handover of the computer hardware and software to the Guyana Police Force by the USAID and UNDP was done on Thursday at the Police Training Centre on Camp Street in Georgetown.

The hardware donated is valued at US$25,000 and the PRMIS software cost US$80,000. Additionally, a total of US$50,000 will be spent on training.

The donation is the first component of the USAID CariSECURE project and will be piloted at the Alberttown and Fort Wellington Police Stations for six months.

After the six months, other stations in Rosignol, Lethem, Suddie, Linden and Bartica may implement the project.

Minister of Public Security Khemraj Ramjattan said the equipment is vital in the fight against violence and crime.

“When this automated system is put in place it will be easier for the Police to capture and analyze the reports made by any person in a police station, once that is completely installed all across the country, right now it will only be at Alberttown and at Fort Wellington,” the Minister said.

According to Ramjattan, the PRMIS will easily find suspects and permits the tracking of address, telephone numbers, criminal history and other information.

“This system will allow the user to easily pull up lists of persons who are known to be child molesters, sex offenders, deportees, murderers, witnesses and also to know where they are,” the Minister said.

The latest crime statistics will also be provided with PRMIS.

“They can tell you that we had two murders for that time period and they name the places and all of that comes up on the computer.”

In 2016, CariSECURE was launched in Guyana; it is a security data development system that aims to strengthen citizen security in the Caribbean.

Minister Ramjattan said in 2017 a national task force was established to implement the CariSECURE process and policies. The task force comprises the Guyana Police Force, the Guyana Prison Service, the Bureau of Statistics, Public Security and Health Ministers, Legal Affairs and the Department of Public Prosecution (DPP).

The Minister said PRMIS is an important enhancement to the police force who will be more secure in investigating crimes.

“It will capture data on all vehicles and if there was suspect vehicles in certain crimes that were reported, the police can now say in another crime…was this car used again?,” the Minister said.

PRMIS can also work along with other justice systems, such as the DPP, the Courts and the Prison.

“So if a case is taking too long, this management system when it is completed can tell us how long this suspect for murder went for a preliminary inquiry and why is it taking so long and we can get all that information because of that system,” the Minister said.

Mark Cullinane, the Chief of Missions at the US Embassy, said the US Government is pleased to partner with Guyana and these are just some of the crucial equipment that will empower the Guyana Police Force in their fight against crime.

“Criminals become savvier every day, and their crimes more sophisticated, thanks to the ever-growing use of information technology. It is therefore imperative that law enforcement officials also make clever use of technology to optimize their work in stopping the illegal activities that cost this country and its people so much,” Cullinane said.

Luca Renda, UNDP Representative to Guyana said this is an important milestone for the Guyana Police Force as it is critical that the force is equipped with the relevant tools to manage and analyze data.

Meanwhile, 30 officers will benefit from a two-day training exercise.

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