Two EBD bridges to be constructed, creating alternate route as $5.6B in contracts inked by Public Works

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A total of $5.9 billion in contracts were signed on Friday by the Ministry of Public Works to construct or rehabilitate several bridges on the coast and hinterland, upgrading road networks and upgrading the Kingston Wharf.

Specifically for the East Bank Demerara, two bridges will be constructed within the Diamond/Grove area to create an alternate route for commuters. Minister of Public Works Juan Edghill, during his remarks at the signing ceremony, said the projects are designed to last for decades.

The $157.6 million contract for rehabilitation or construction of a bridge linking Grove to Jimbo Bridge Road on the East Bank was awarded to O&O Contracting Services.

The construction of a bridge linking Grove to Craig, also on the East Bank, was awarded to A&A Engineering Services at a cost of $47.9 million.

“Two of these bridges are intended to give access to Diamond/Grove area so it will be able to give us an alternative route to be able to execute works on that Diamond thoroughfare which is proving to be very difficult and problematic,” Minister Edghill stated.

Three other contracts were signed for the rehabilitation or construction of bridges at Linden, on the East Coast Demerara and Sophia in Georgetown.

Modern Construction & Trucking Service was awarded the $49.8 million contract for the bridge linking ‘B’ Field Sophia and Guyhoc Park.

A few of the contractors on Friday at the Ministry of Public Works

The $33.7 million contract for the construction or rehabilitation of a bridge linking Block 22 to Canvas City in Linden was awarded to Khan’s Construction & Transportation Services.

Meanwhile, the construction or rehabilitation of a bridge at Ann’s Grove, East Coast Demerara was awarded to M. Sukhai Contracting Services at a cost of $35.9 million.

Hinterland bridges

Contracts for 13 bridges between Mabura Hill and Kurupakari along the Linden/Lethem trail were also inked and will be executed in three lots.

KP Thomas & Sons Contracting was awarded the $817.2M contract for the rehabilitation of four bridges between Mabura Hill and Kurupakari. Dax Contracting Service inked the $819.4 million contract for an additional four bridges while Theodore Faria General Contracting Service was awarded the $765.1 million contract for the remaining five bridges.

In total, $2.7B in contracts were signed for the bridges on the coast and hinterland.

Rehabilitation of roads

Colin Talbot Contracting Service was awarded the $348 million contract for the rehabilitation and upgrade of (Section 1) of Aubrey Barker Road in Georgetown.

The $349.5 million contract for the upgrade of (Section 2) Aubrey Barker Road was awarded to Surrey Paving and Aggregate Company (Guyana).

Devcon Construction & Contracting Services signed the $306.6 million contract for the upgrade of Lamaha Street between Vlissengen Road to Middleton Street in Georgetown.

SAWA Investment Inc inked the $192 million contract for the rehabilitation of Lamaha Street between Middleton and Sherriff Streets.

The $295 million contract for the rehabilitation of Arapaima Street, East La Penitence in Georgetown was awarded to Vieira 66 Logistics.

In Region Three, two contracts were signed for the upgrade of road networks.

AJM Enterprise received the $118.3 million contract for upgrade works at Canal No.1 (Phase Three) while R&B Enterprise signed the $103.5 million contract for upgrade works at Canal No. 2 (Phase Three).

Associated Construction Services inked the $104.1 million contract for upgrade of road networks at Black Bush Polder (Yakasari) in Region Six.

In total, $1.8 billion in contracts were signed for roads.

Maritime safety

Ivor Allen received the $44.1 million contract for the construction of beacons to support navigational aids at Middle Ground.

For the upgrade of the Kingston Wharf, Kares Engineering Inc was awarded the $1 billion contract.

“We are advancing our infrastructure and putting in what is called resilient infrastructure as it relates to our bridges. We have to take out the timber bridges that we have traditionally used and we have to be able to put in things that will last us 20, 30, 40 years,” Edghill said.

He made an appeal to all contractors to not interrupt the lives of people while doing works and to engage with the communities they are working in. He also told contractors who signed contracts on Friday that these works are to commence before the Christmas holidays.

 

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